Model Veterinary Practice Act

Every state has a veterinary practice act, and many veterinary state boards and state legislatures rely on the AVMA’s Model Veterinary Practice Act as a valued resource when making revisions to their acts or when they have questions on issues related to the practice of veterinary medicine. In an effort to reflect professional, technological and societal changes, the AVMA Model Veterinary Practice Act is undergoing a review by an AVMA task force.

We’re asking you – valued members of the AVMA – as well as pet owners, the public, and anybody who cares about animals and veterinary medicine, to participate in an open comment period on our model practice act. We’re looking for specific suggestions you might have on how we might revise or update the model in order to help shape the future of veterinary medicine. We encourage you to review our model practice act, talk about it with your colleagues and submit any updates you think are necessary. Your comments will be gathered and considered by the task force members as they deliberate any proposed changes.

We’re providing this early notice now because we know that you need adequate time to give this important topic the attention it deserves. The current AVMA Model Practice Act is available for public review on the AVMA website. Organizations and individuals can make comments about the model practice act on the AVMA website during the 30-day public comment period that is scheduled to start in January 2011. We’ll keep you posted as the date approaches so that we can guide you to the right place to share your comments. Thanks in advance for participating.

4 thoughts on “Model Veterinary Practice Act

  1. Yvette Contier :Having been notified that this act prohibits me as an animal owner from seeking alternative forms of therapy for my animals is prohibited without a veterinarian prompts me to write imploring legislators to reconsider, revise and/or omit this prohibition as outlined under this act.
    Over the years I have engaged the services of massage therapists, chiropractors and acupuncturists which have provided great relief for my animals, when veterinary medicine has offered none.
    I understand an attempt at regulating alternatives therapies to protect our animals but in doing so with this legislation, the brush is so broad as to completely make unavailable any help for our pets when veterinary practices fail.
    The vast array of alternative specialists and their education would prohibit the event of including these therapies as part of the veterinary curriculum.
    It has been incumbent upon us, as animal owners, to research and appropriately dispatch the alternative specialist of our choosing, always with the caveat of “first, do no harm.” Please, do not take away our right to offer our animals relief in times when veterinary medicine can offer none. This act causes great harm to our beloved pets.
    Yvette S. Contier<A href="mailto:

  2. Having been notified that this act prohibits me as an animal owner from seeking alternative forms of therapy for my animals is prohibited without a veterinarian prompts me to write imploring legislators to reconsider, revise and/or omit this prohibition as outlined under this act.

    Over the years I have engaged the services of massage therapists, chiropractors and acupuncturists which have provided great relief for my animals, when veterinary medicine has offered none.

    I understand an attempt at regulating alternatives therapies to protect our animals but in doing so with this legislation, the brush is so broad as to completely make unavailable any help for our pets when veterinary practices fail.

    The vast array of alternative specialists and their education would prohibit the event of including these therapies as part of the veterinary curriculum.

    It has been incumbent upon us, as animal owners, to research and appropriately dispatch the alternative specialist of our choosing, always with the caveat of “first, do no harm.” Please, do not take away our right to offer our animals relief in times when veterinary medicine can offer none. This act causes great harm to our beloved pets.

    Yvette S. Contier
    ysc492@comcast.net
    (650) 359-5093
    (650) 773-5878

  3. AVMA needs to contend themselves to Veterinary Practices & not be concerning themselves with NON-veterinary practices, such as chiropractic, ect. There is enough business for them to contend with in lieu of even more Federal intervention in every aspect of our lives. Stay with what you know.

  4. As the profession continues to grow and subdivide into more specialties, it will be important to have guidelines in the practice act for each of those particular disciplines. Of interest to me is veterinary behavior. At this time, serious problems which have a physiologic response associated such as separation anxiety and serious aggression can be treated by anyone regardless of experience. In my opinion, the AVMA practice act should specify the veterinarian’s role in treating companion animal behavior problems in order to avoid inadequate or inappropriate treatments and serious repercussions to animal health, well being and quality of life.