Comments Sought for Model Veterinary Practice Act

Beginning January 7, 2011, AVMA members are invited to submit comments on changes they would like to see in the AVMA Model Veterinary Practice Act (MVPA). The official public comment period, which is open to non-members as well, will run from January 15 to February 14, 2011. A 12-member task force will review the comments and make recommendations for revisions to the MVPA to the Executive Board.

Individuals and organizations may review the MVPA and submit comments through a link on the AVMA web site, www.avma.org/issues/policy/mvpa.asp. The AVMA requests that the comments be specific and include suggested language for the task force to consider.

The AVMA adopted the MVPA in 1964 to serve as a model set of guiding principles for lawmakers who regulate the practice of veterinary medicine under the laws and regulations of an individual state. Since then, the model act has been revised periodically to reflect professional, technological, and societal changes. The last two major revisions were approved in 1997 and 2003.  While a complete rewrite of the MVPA may not be necessary at this time, a careful review will hopefully produce improvements and updates in the model act.

10 thoughts on “Comments Sought for Model Veterinary Practice Act

  1. Thank you for sharing your perspective with us. Please consider submitting your comment on the web site during the public comment period starting on Jan 15 .we will receive on the exemptions to the definition of veterinary medicine.

  2. Pingback: MASH News « Main Street Animal Services of Hopkinton

  3. Vet hospitals should use natural substances that work well, for example, FISH OIL over STEROIDS.
    My cat Betty had severe inflammation of her ureters and could not pee. I brought her to the big animal hospital in Waltham on a Saturday… they had to catheterize her, put tube in, told me she had cancer…they did a biopsy which cost me $6,000 all told…sent her home to me with tubes coming out of her and still blocked/could not pee-tubes were to get urine out of bladder! I took her to Mashvet (holistic vets) in tears. On that day while in her office the other vet called to say Betty did NOT have cancer. Margo Roman gave her a bunch of vitamins and strong fish oil that I had to give her 3 times a day with a food syringe. Within 4 days she was UNBLOCKED, symptoms GONE, and she was peeing normally! Strong FISH OIL reduced the inflammation that was blocking her ureters. Regular vets and hospitals will NOT use fish oil…they will use steroids, which cause the body not to heal itself, which is why they would not use steroids to get inflammation down because they wanted to operate and make thousands of dollars off me. They put my cat and I through tremendous trauma and me into serious debt.
    Had I got to the holistic vet Betty would have been put on strong fish oil and nutritional supplements and immune boosters right away to get the inflammation down before this expensive biopsy for cancer and my bill would have been around $600 and NOT $6,000.
    What is wrong with traditional western medicine that will NOT use FISH OIL but will use STEROIDS that keep the body from healing itself? Because they wanted to operate and make $ after $6,000 my cat was still blocked and could not urinate. This is NOT right!

  4. So let’s see if I’ve got this straight. Even though I can go to a massage therapist, herbalist, acupuncturist, etc–AND THEY ARE NOT PHYSICIANS–for my own health, I would not have the right to have that done to my horse? Hmmm, let’s see. There’s something wrong with that picture. And can you imagine what a vet would charge for a two hour body work session? They are trying to take away my right to know and choose what’s best for my horse. I have the right to decide that for myself. It would be different if these non vet massage therapists, dentists, acupuncturists, etc, were trying to pass as vets, but I have never seen one do that. It seems they are trying to strip us of our rights to take care of our own animals just to get more business for themselves.

  5. @mae michaud
    Mae, we don’t set vaccine “laws” or requirements for vaccines – we recommend that pet owners consult with their veterinarians about a program that’s right for each pet. Also, at this time, there is a lot of question as to how the titers correlate with actual protection from infection. That’s why there’s a lot of confusion – we want the animals to be protected, but there is question about the reliability of vaccination titers when it comes to protecting pets from potentially fatal diseases (and protecting public health).
    With regard to your comment about keeping this private, I just wanted to let you know that we did the following to promote this: 1) we issued a press release, which was picked up by many of the major media outlets and newspapers; 2) we put it on our website’s home page several times, and plan to do it again until the deadline; 3) we tweeted about it a number of times on our feed, AVMAvets, and each tweet was retweeted many times by other’s twitter feeds; 4) we have posted it on other social media channels such as Facebook. This blog entry was just one of a number of ways that we announced this to veterinarians and to the public.

  6. A strong push to change the Vaccine requirement laws! I get my dogs titered every year and they are consistently way over what is required for protection, yet they’re still supposed to be vaccinated!!!!! Makes NO sense at all. Also, REPUTABLE vets would not push voluntary vaccines for the fees generated. A few basic/minimal vaccines when a puppy will carry the dog throughout life. – Lastly, this very concealed and private “public forum” only creates mistrust. If AVMA was serious about change or public concerns – the public would truly be made aware of this opportunity. This is almost kept a secret! So much for trusting the AVMA’s intentions. Thank you.

  7. Thank you also for your sharing your thoughts on alterative treatments. Again, don’t forget to submit your comment on the web site during the public comment period starting on Jan 15.

  8. I would like to see complementary and Holistic/Alternatives offered including but no limited to: Homeopathy, acupuncture, massage, herbalism, reiki, and also nutrition — not just good healthy food to prevent problems from arising, but good healthy food to treat various conditions — those Hills special diets, etc are filled with undesirable additives.

  9. Jennie: Thank you for sharing your perspective with us. Please consider submitting your comment on the web site during the public comment period starting on Jan 15 so the task force will see what you have to say together with all of the other comments that we will receive on the exemptions to the definition of veterinary medicine.

    Adrian

  10. So much is left out we need things like massage therapy not listed as acts of vet med, we need access to trained equine dentists, since there is no way for vets to treat all the horses well that need to care, etc. We all have things we want to see covered in a rational way. I would like to see complementary and Holistic/Alternatives offered including but no limited to: Homeopathy, acupuncture, massage, herbalism, reiki, etc. Please consider this.