USDA Proposes Strengthening Health Requirements for Dogs Imported into the U.S.

The USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) announced yesterday that they are proposing to strengthen the restrictions on importation of dogs into the United States for purposes of resale, research and veterinary treatment.

 The change would prohibit importation of the animals, with certain exceptions, unless they are in good health, have received all necessary vaccinations and are at least 6 months old.

 Under the proposal, dogs imported into the continental United States or Hawaii would have to be accompanied by two certificates, each bearing the signature and license number of the veterinarian issuing it: 

  • An original health certificate; and
  • A valid health rabies vaccination certificate.

The dogs also would have to come with an APHIS-issued import permit.

 You can learn more about the proposal, and submit comments, on the APHIS website. Comments must be received by Oct. 31.

One thought on “USDA Proposes Strengthening Health Requirements for Dogs Imported into the U.S.

  1. I am glad to see that APHIS is starting to follow the lead of other developed countries and monitor the health of the animals imported. Although a good first step, I am concerned this proposal does not include personal pets accompanying their visiting or immigrating owners. I would also like to ensure that animals imported for the sake of “rescue” are included in these regulations as well — unsure if they fall under “resale”. Another thing to consider would be cats, especially from rabies endemic areas.