Veterinary Salaries: AVMA Releases Report on Veterinary Compensation

Times are tough. You need an edge. Whether you are a new or established practice, economic insights into what’s happening in veterinary medicine can help grow your business.

Whether you’re looking for reliable data on professional earnings, employee fringe benefits or starting salaries for graduating veterinarians, the 2013 edition of the AVMA’s Report on Veterinary Compensation has what you’re looking for and can be purchased online in either PDF or softcover book form at a reduced member rate. If you’re looking for detailed information on financial data related to private practices, you can turn to the AVMA Report on Veterinary Practice Business Measures, which also is available in both PDF and softcover formats. Packaged PDF or book rates for both publications also are available.

Both publications contain timely and accurate information that is designed to help you make informed practice and career decisions. The data also allow AVMA staff and leadership to take a critical look at the financial state of veterinary practices as we continue to help ensure the profitable and productive delivery of veterinary services.

Update Posted March 28, 2013: We would like to direct you to a few online resources where you can find salary and professional data excerpted from the AVMA Report on Veterinary Compensation.

Members can access information on median salary by practice type through the AVMA’s website. The page also contains data on the number of veterinarians by position and gender.

Our online salary calculator allows you to see percentile breakdowns of salaries based on practice type, years of experience and owner/associate status.

In addition, members also can turn to the website for first-year employment salary information that highlights starting salaries for 2012 U.S. veterinary medical college graduates by distribution of pay level and professional discipline.

Finally, a JAVMA News article containing additional information will be published in print April 1 and is currently available online.  Summaries of the report also will be published in future issues of JAVMA.

14 thoughts on “Veterinary Salaries: AVMA Releases Report on Veterinary Compensation

  1. I read the article and viewed the tables on the AVMA website. Based on the table regarding private practice, it appears that the median pretax income is either 88,000 or 100,000 based on approx 60000 practicitioners. Is this correct?

    How many veterinarians actually responded to the survey and how were they chosen? Sharing this information would be very helpful.

    • Thanks for writing, Dr. Nutt.

      The research methodology for the study is reported in detail in the AVMA Report on Veterinary Compensation. To answer your specific question, the survey was conducted via postal mail in April 2012. Surveys were sent to a random sample of 16,000 private practice and public or corporate veterinarians. The random sample consisted of 6,356 veterinarians identified as private practice owners and 9,644 either identified as non-practice owners (associates or public or corporate-employed veterinarians) or whose employment type was not identified in the membership database. After field work was completed, a total of 4,194 surveys were completed and returned (26.2%). Of the 4,194 surveys returned, 2,045 surveys from private practice veterinarians and 1,085 surveys from public and industry-employed veterinarians were deemed to be usable responses (74.6%).

      Of those that took the survey, the median income was $100,000 for those in private practice in 2011 and $97,000 in 2009. Mean income was $118,726 in 2011, down from 2009 ($121,303). While there was a 3.1% increase in median income, there was a drop in mean income of 2.1% during the two year period.

      • Thank you for your response. I did look up the links that you had put up but was unable to find the information easily.

        As far as the private practice numbers go, was their any attempt to break these down by region? Is there any information with regards to being an associate or an owner?

        Thank you
        Greg

  2. How is the data collected and how many responses were there? I have a hard time believing that salaries went up at the same time pracitce income has decreased.

  3. Having been one of those surveyed for a few years, the survey tool doesn’t fit a non-traditional (i.e., non-practicing, non-USDA employee) role. The tool needs to be revised in order to accurately capture (or exclude!) those colleagues, in order to avoid possible skewing/confounding of the dollar and hours data. However, the tool doesn’t allow one to say that.

  4. Thanks for sharing your concerns with us about access to data from the AVMA Report on Veterinary Compensation and the AVMA Report on Veterinary Practice Business Measures. We apologize for the confusion and would like to direct you to a few resources where you can find salary and professional data.

    Members can access information on median salary by practice type through the AVMA’s website at https://www.avma.org/KB/Resources/Statistics/Pages/Market-research-statistics-US-veterinarians.aspx. The page also contains data on the number of veterinarians by position and gender.

    Our online salary calculator (https://www.avma.org/ProfessionalDevelopment/Pages/salary-calculator.aspx) allows members to see percentile breakdowns of salaries based on practice type, years of experience and owner/associate status.

    In addition, members also can turn to the website for first-year employment salary information (https://www.avma.org/KB/Resources/Statistics/Pages/Market-research-statistics-First-year-employment.aspx) that highlights starting salaries for 2012 U.S. veterinary medical college graduates by distribution of pay level and professional discipline.

    Finally, a JAVMA News article containing additional information will be published in print April 1 and is currently available online at https://www.avma.org/News/JAVMANews/Pages/130401d.aspx. Summaries of the report also will be published in future issues of JAVMA.

  5. WOW! WOW! you want us to pay that much for info we gave you!?
    How about next time just kick me in the back when I pay my AVMA dues! It will feel about the same.

  6. Charge industry and non members for this data. It should belong to the members already!

  7. I recommend that the AVMA provide the report free to AVMA members upon request. The data is of value, and you don’t necessarily need to publish it as done historically.

  8. I agree. We participate willingly, and pay annual dues. We should at least have access to a brief version of the study with maybe an option to buy a full version if we’d like. This is the first time I can remember not being able to see any information. Not pleased.

  9. I totally agree with the Grey Man and Kurt Weingand. Did at least PART of the professional study data get published in JAVMA?

  10. Judging by the price, and the cover art, I’d say that Dr. DeHaven has decided what the new logo should be.

    Seriously, you’ve already spent OUR money to study data WE provided, yet have the temerity to charge us to download OUR results?

    Tar. Feathers.

  11. Wow. Times are tough! Can’t recall the AVMA ever charging members extra for profession study data. I’ll remember that the next time you send around the request for salary information. So for what are my annual dues paying?