Congress: It’s time to protect horse welfare by taking action on the anti-soring bill

By: Dr. Whitney Miller, assistant director, Governmental Relations Division 

This week, the Prevent All Soring Tactics (PAST) Act passed yet another key milestone: it reached over 300 cosponsors in the House of Representatives! This outpouring of congressional support on both sides of the aisle shows that this important bill, which will bring the necessary changes to once and for all end the cruel and inhumane practice of soring, needs to get passed into law. The AVMA implores Congress to bring this issue to a vote on the floor in the Senate and House of Representatives as quickly as possible to improve the welfare of America’s walking horses.

As you know, we’ve done a lot of outreach lately on this important bill, including attending the June 18 “Walk on Washington” rally, which highlighted the beautiful natural gait of Tennessee Walking Horses on the nation’s capital. Last week, I also had the privilege of being a guest on Dr. Katy’s “The Pet Show” to educate the D.C. public about this important issue and urge them to contact their members of Congress in support of this bill.

The time is NOW for Congress to stop its political posturing and act on a bill that will protect our nation’s walking horses. Do your part and tell your congressional representatives to pass the PAST Act today!

6 thoughts on “Congress: It’s time to protect horse welfare by taking action on the anti-soring bill

  1. It is a shame that a group of educated people can be lead around by their nose and that is all this is. A very well known veterinarian from out side the Walking Horse industry check horses after the USDA and admitted there was nothing wrong with 70% of the horses he checked. He told the truth about our horse and for that he was trashed by other members of the clinic where he worked. ROOD & RIDDLE by far the best equine clinic in the US.
    I would like to know what the h$u$ gave the AVMA to get their support for the past act.

    • The only horses the veterinarian from Rood & Riddle checked were the ones turned down by the USDA. Again he told the truth which is far more than I can say for the USDA inspectors who say they can feel a scar even though it is only 2 or 3 cells think! Some one please give me a break.

    • My response to this comment is my own. I work for the AVMA, but I’m not making this comment on behalf of AVMA.

      Jerry, the AVMA didn’t receive any money for supporting the PAST Act. The AVMA, AAEP, and a large number of veterinary organizations are in support of the PAST Act because it’s the right thing to do. Soring has been illegal for more than 40 years, yet it continues and the horses suffer. I can personally attest to that suffering because my first horse had been a “Big Lick” walking horse in his younger days before I got him, and he had the scars and chronic lameness issues to prove it. They’re beautiful horses with naturally beautiful gaits, and it’s reprehensible to cause them such severe pain and suffering all for the sake of a prize and money. There is NO benefit to the horse at all of soring, the only benefit is to the people who make money from the exaggerated gait it produces.

      By your comment that 70% of the horses had “nothing wrong,” you’re saying that 30% DID have problems. That’s nearly 1/3 of the horses checked by that vet that had been sored. To me, a 30% incidence of blatant violations of federal law says that the problem is not under control. The industry obviously cannot police itself and has shown a blatant disregard for the health and welfare of these horses. To me, it’s a bigger shame that an industry continues not only to allow, but to REWARD, a cruel practice that makes horses suffer for the sake of lining someone’s pockets.

  2. The time is NOW for Congress to stop its political posturing and act on a bill that will protect our nation’s walking horses